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Azerbaycan Saytlari

 »  Home  »  Endodontic Articles 12  »  A scanning electron microscopic study of dentinal erosion by final irrigation with EDTA and NaOCl solutions
A scanning electron microscopic study of dentinal erosion by final irrigation with EDTA and NaOCl solutions
Results.



  • GroupA: Typical amorphous smear layer was observed on the root canal wall of each specimen (Fig. 1, A1-3).
  • GroupB: Peritubular and intertubular surface dentine appeared smooth and flat. Individual dentinal tubule orifices were clearly observed. A small amount of debris was observed on the dentine wall at each distance from the apex (Fig.1, B1-3).
  • Group C: At 3 and 6 mm from the apex, peritubular and intertubular surface dentine was neither smooth nor flat. Dentinal tubule orifices were seen to be irregularly enlarged and rough in appearance. A small amount of debris also remained (Fig. 1, C1-3).
  • Group D: Similar to group B, the root canal walls appeared smooth and flat (Fig.1, D1-3).
  • Group E: Severe peritubular and intertubular dentinal erosion was observed. Surface dentine was neither smooth nor flat, and dentinal tubule orifices were irregularly enlarged. In some areas, excessive erosion led to the conjugation of two or more dentinal tubules (Fig.1, E1-3 and Fig. 2).
Figure 3 shows the grades given for remaining debris in groups B-E. At 6 mm from the apex, the remaining debris of group E was significantly less than that of groups B or D (one-way anova, Fisher’s PLSD test, P < 0.05).
Figure 4 depicts the diameter of dentinal tubules. For each group, at 3 and 6 mm from the apex, the diameters of dentinal tubules of group E were significantly larger than those of group D, and those of group C were larger than those of group B (one-way anova, Fisher’s PLSD test, P < 0.05).

Figure 1. Photomicrographs of root canal wall in each group after final irrigation (original magnification: 3000x; scale bar in A1 is 10 mm). A1-E1, A2-E2 and A3-E3 show canal walls at 6, 3 and 1 mm from apex, respectively. In group A, typical amorphous smear layer on root canal wall, and no dentinal tubule openings were observed. In groups B and D, peritubular and intertubular surface dentine appeared smooth and flat. Individual orifices of dentinal tubules were clearly observed. In groups C and E, erosion of peritubular and intertubular dentine was observed. The surface of dentine wall was neither smooth nor ?at, and dentinal tubule orifices were irregularly enlarged and were rough in appearance. In some areas, excessive erosion led to conjugation of two or more dentinal tubules.

Photomicrographs of root canal wall in each group after final irrigation

Figure 2. Peritubular and intertubular detinal erosion at 6 mm from apex in group E. Original magnifications of left and right photographs are 4000 and 15 000x, respectively. Dentine was neither smooth nor ?at, and dentinal tubule orifices were irregularly enlarged and were rough in appearance.

eritubular and intertubular detinal erosion

Figure 3. Score of remaining debris (*P < 0.05).

Score of remaining debris

Figure 4. Diameter of dentinal tubules (*P < 0.05).

Diameter of dentinal tubules