Article Options
Categories


Search


Advanced Search



This service is provided on D[e]nt Publishing standard Terms and Conditions. Please read our Privacy Policy. To enquire about a licence to reproduce material from endodonticsjournal.com and/or JofER, click here.
This website is published by D[e]nt Publishing Ltd, Phoenix AZ, US.
D[e]nt Publishing is part of the specialist publishing group Oral Science & Business Media Inc.

Creative Commons License


Recent Articles RSS:
Subscribe to recent articles RSS
or Subscribe to Email.

Blog RSS:
Subscribe to blog RSS
or Subscribe to Email.


Azerbaycan Saytlari

 »  Home  »  Endodontic Articles 4  »  Prevalence of yeasts in saliva and root canals of teeth associated with apical periodontitis
Prevalence of yeasts in saliva and root canals of teeth associated with apical periodontitis
Results.



Yeast species recovered from saliva and root canal samples.
Fifty-nine saliva and 60 root canal samples were obtained from the 55 patients. Five patients had two teeth sampled and four patients gave a second saliva sample (Table 2). Yeasts were more frequently recovered from saliva (19/59 or 32.2%) than root canal (6/60 or 10%) samples. Of the six yeast-positive root canals, two had no previous root treatment (out of a total of 35) and four had previous root treatment (out of a total of 25).
Twenty-three isolates were recovered from saliva and eight from the root canal samples. They were identified to the species level (Table 3) with the majority belonging to the genus Candida (29% of patients or 74% of isolates). Of the yeast species isolated from saliva, C. albicans was the most prevalent (17/23 or 73.9%) followed by R. mucilaginosa (2/23), C. dubliniensis (1/23), C. tropicalis (1/23) and Cryptococcus humicolus (1/23) (Table 3). The yeast species recovered from root canals were R. mucilaginosa (4/8), C. albicans (3/8), and C. sake (1/8) (Table 3). The clinical details of the patients with yeast-positive root canal samples are presented in Table 4. The medical history indicated that none of these patients was immuno-compromised but all had received at least one course of antibiotics within the previous 12 months.

Table 2. Summary of number of patients involved in the study and results from sampling.

Summary of number of patients involved in the study and results from sampling

Table 3. Yeast species recovered from saliva and root canal samples and their concentration in colony forming unit (CFU) counts.
a. The Rapid ID result did not correspond with hyphal morphology.
b. The Rapid ID result did not correspond with germ tube formation test.

Yeast species recovered from saliva and root canal samples and their concentration in colony forming unit

Table 4. Summary of clinical details from patients with yeast-positive root canal samples.

Summary of clinical details from patients with yeast-positive root canal samples

Statistical analysis.
The associations between the presence of yeasts in root canals (dependent variable) and the presence of yeasts in saliva, leakage of restorations, previous root canal treatment and antibiotic history (explanatory variables) are presented in Tables 5–9.
The relationship between the presence of yeasts in root canals and saliva is presented in Table 5. Their association was highly significant ( P = 0.021), with canals being 13.8 times (95% CI = 1.5–129.9) more likely to have yeasts isolated when they were also present in saliva (Table 6). Further logistic regression analysis also revealed that the significant effect of yeasts in saliva on the presence of yeasts in root canals was maintained when the effect of potential confounders was controlled (Table 7). The effects of restoration leakage ( P = 0.08) and previous root canal treatment ( P = 0.123) were equivocal (Table 6). The effect of systemic antibiotic history could not be analysed, due to the absence of samples with positive yeasts in root canal and negative antibiotic history (Table 8). The history of antibiotic therapy (Table 9) was not associated with the presence of yeasts in saliva (OR = 1.1).

Table 5. Summary of the relationship between prevalence of yeasts in root canals and saliva.

Summary of the relationship between prevalence of yeasts in root canals and saliva

Table 6. Univariate logistic regression models for individual explanatory variables (yeasts in saliva, restoration leakage, previous root canal treatment) given separately.

Univariate logistic regression models for individual explanatory variables given separately
*Confidence interval.

Table 7. Logistic regression models for the effect of yeasts in saliva adjusted for restoration leakage or/and previous root treatment.

Logistic regression models for the effect of yeasts in saliva adjusted for restoration leakage or/and previous root treatment

Table 8. Summary of relation between the presence of yeasts in root canals and antibiotic history (n = 55 patients)

Summary of relation between the presence of yeasts in root canals and antibiotic history

Table 9. Summary of relation between the presence of yeasts in saliva and antibiotic history (n = 55 patients).

Summary of relation between the presence of yeasts in saliva and antibiotic history
Crude odds ratio = 1.1.