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Azerbaycan Saytlari

 »  Home  »  Endodontic Articles 1  »  Root and canal morphology of Thai mandibular molars
Root and canal morphology of Thai mandibular molars
Results.



The data for root and canal number and their morphology are presented in Tables 1–5.
Of the 118 first molars, 12.7% had three roots with the extra root lingual to the main distal root (Table 1). The majority had three (61%) or four (30%) canals (Table 2). In the three-rooted molars, 80% of the main distal root and 100% of the disto-lingual roots had type I canals. The majority (66.7%) of the root canals in the mesial root were type IV. The remainder were distributed between type III and additional types 3–1, 3–4, and 2–3 (Table 3).

Classification of Thai mandibular molars by root number and morphology
Table 1. Classification of Thai mandibular molars by root number and morphology.

Number and percentage of mandibular molars with 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 canals per tooth
Table 2. Number and percentage of mandibular molars with 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 canals per tooth.
Number and percentage of canal system types in mandibular first molars
Table 3. Number and percentage of canal system types in mandibular first molars.

Of the 60 second molars, 10% had a single C-shaped root, whilst the rest had two separate roots (Table 1). The majority had three (58%) or two (23%) canals (Table 2). These roots had an equal chance (33.3%) of containing one of three canal configurations: type I, type IV or the additional 3–4 or 2–3 varieties. In the two-rooted molars, the majority (70.4%) of the distal roots had a type I canal system, whilst only 14.8% of the mesial roots had this configuration. The majority (57.4%) of the mesial roots were type IV, followed by type II (Table 4).

Number and percentage of canal system types in mandibular second molars
Table 4. Number and percentage of canal system types in mandibular second molars.

The 173 third molars had the highest variation in root morphology, as well as a high prevalence of two separate roots (67%), two-fused roots (19.1%) and C-shaped roots (10.9%) (Table 1). The majority had two (61%) or three (28%) canals (Table 2). The teeth with fused roots contained a spread of canal configurations: types IV (33.3%), I (21.2%) and II (18.2%), with a few teeth having other varieties. In the C-shaped group, although the most prevalent canal configuration was type IV (36.8%), there was a wide spread of types, including I (15.8%), VIII (15.8%), II (5.3%) and additional varieties (26.4% collectively). In three-rooted teeth, all the distal canals were type I and the mesial canals were either type II (50%) or IV (50%). In the two-rooted variety, the dominant canal configuration in both mesial and distal canals was type I (53% and 93.2%, respectively). The remainder were distributed amongst several types (Table 5).

Number and percentage of canal system types in mandibular third molars
Table 5. Number and percentage of canal system types in mandibular third molars.

There was an increasing prevalence of lateral canals toward the apical part of the root for all types of molars (Table 6) with the highest being 4.1% in the apical third of mandibular third molars. Inter-canal communications were found more commonly in the first (39.8%) and second (43%) molars than the third molar (19.4%) (Table 6).

Number and percentage of roots with lateral canals and intercanal communications
Table 6. Number and percentage of roots with lateral canals and intercanal communications.