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Azerbaycan Saytlari

 »  Home  »  Endodontic Articles 10  »  Calcium sulphate as a bone substitute for various osseous defects in conjunction with apicectomy
Calcium sulphate as a bone substitute for various osseous defects in conjunction with apicectomy
Results.



Histological findings.
Calciumsulphate was not observed on any specimens at 8and16 weeks after surgery. New bone filled the osseous defects on both sides at 16 weeks. In type1defects, bone was not observed on the buccal side of the root in both experimental and control teeth at 8 and 16 weeks, although the apical part of the defect was filled with bone (Fig. 3). In some specimens on the experimental side, inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the soft tissue along the root surface from the gingival sulcus to the periapical area, and epithelial down growth was also observed. In both type 2 and type 3 defects, no inflammation was observed in any specimens. Type 2 defects on the experimental side were completely filled with cancellous bone, whilst those on the control side were incompletely filled with one at 8 weeks (Fig. 4). At 16 weeks, cortical bone on the experimental side showed little concavity, whilst on the control side it was obviously concave. Type 3 defects on the experimental side were filled with cancellous bone, although most of type 3 defects on the control side were in completely filled with one at 8 weeks. At 16 weeks, the osseous defects on both sides were almost closed with the newly formed cortical bone. The newly formed cortical bone on the control side was, however, more concave than that on the experimental side at16 weeks (Fig. 5).

Figure 3. Representative section of type1 at 16 weeks. The bone on the buccal side of the root had not been observed in the experimental teeth at 16 weeks after surgery. Arrowheads indicate the outer edge of the original cortical bone. (x20, toluidine blue stain).

The bone on the buccal side of the root had not been observed in the experimental teeth at 16 weeks after surgery

Figure 4. Representative sections of type 2 at 8 weeks. (A) The osseous defect was fully filled with cancellous bone on the experimental side. (B) Newly formed bone was obviously concave on the control side. Arrowheads indicate the outer edge of the original cortical bone. (x20, toluidine blue stain).

Representative sections of type 2 at 8 weeks

Figure 5. Representative sections of type 3 at16 weeks. (A) Newly formed cortical bone was slightly concave on the experimental side. (B) That on the control side was more clearly concave. Arrowheads indicate the outer edge of the original cortical bone. (x20, toluidine blue stain).

Newly formed cortical bone was slightly concave on the experimental side

Morphometrical evaluations.
In type 1 defects, morphometrical evaluations were not performed because bone on the buccal side of the roots was not observed on either side at 8 and16 weeks.

BV/TV (Fig. 6).
In type 2 defects, BV/TVs on the experimental side and control side were 58.3 and 29.2% at 8 weeks, and 73.0 and 55.6% at 16 weeks, respectively. In type 3 defects, BV/TVs on the experimental side and control side were 68.4 and 51.6% at 8 weeks, and 81.3 and 64.5% at 16 weeks, respectively. In both type 2 and 3 defects, BV/TVs on the experimental side were significantly higher than those on the control side (P < 0.01).

Figure 6. Bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) (%).

Bone volume, tissue volume

MAR (Fig. 7).
In type 2 defects, MARs on the experimental side and control side were 1.15 and 0.80 mm day_1 at 8 weeks, and 0.87 and 0.68 mm day_1 at 16 weeks, respectively. In type 3 defects, MARs on the experimental side and control side were 1.22 and 0.78 mm day_1 at 8 weeks, and 0.94 and 0.81 mm day_1 at 16 weeks, respectively. In both type 2 and 3 defects, MARs on the experimental side were significantly higher than those on the control side (P < 0.01).

Figure 7. Mineral apposition rate (MAR) (mm day_1).

Mineral apposition rate